Coming out of depression

When clients do begin coming out, to themselves and/or to others, mental health professionals can be supportive in a variety of ways. During this period, LGBT adolescents are especially in need of support groups (to develop social skills; to discuss sexuality, sexual identity, and/or gender identity; to find support and understanding from peers; to share information; and to socialize), family support, advocacy, health and social services, health education, role models and mentors (Gonsiorek, 1988), and career guidance (Browning, 1987). For bisexual clients, the PLISSIT model of counseling (Horowitz & Newcomb,1999) may prove valuable when applied to art therapy, due to the unique issues that bisexuals bring, such as feelings of alienation from both homosexuals and heterosexuals, and uncertainty about sexual attractions for different genders. This model is made up of four parts: Permission (giving the client permission to explore a new identity), Limited Information (helping the client to sort out identity questions and validate new feelings by connecting the client with local resources), Specific Suggestions (which may include guidance about when to disclose to family and how to build a support network), and Intensive Therapy for a small number of clients for whom pathology interferes with their ability to function.

Coming out of depression

coming out of depression

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