How to write abstract thesis

I often write or revise abstracts last. The ideal time for me is after working through the entire article or proposal. Not immediately after, when I'm tired and may be tempted to dash off something quick; but just long enough for it all to percolate and brew up a clear vision of what I've accomplished. If such vision appears, I just do my best-or possibly decide the article really lacks coherence and needs yet another thorough overhaul! If the vision does appear, I try to capture a good snapshot for the harried potential reader, hoping at least one of us will benefit.

These materials were made possible thanks to the generous support from the Kemper K. Knapp Bequest Committee. Here are some very successful sample abstracts from a range of different disciplines written by advanced undergraduate students.  Notice that while all of them are strong, interesting, and convincing, each one was written at a different point in the project’s process.  Some (like Benjamin Herman’s history abstract and Diana Dewi and Jennifer Kittleson’s apparel and textile design abstract ) include nearly final results, while others (like Laura Silberman’s curriculum & instruction abstract ) include preliminary and projected results.

A good abstract provides an idea of why the original research this paper is based upon provides an added value to the conference and the ongoing dialogue in the field. It is obviously not easy to squeeze the research of an entire PhD thesis into a few lines. You will need to focus on one specific angle, answering four straightforward questions:
a) What is the problem you address?
b) What method(s) do you use to research this problem?
c) What data have you been able to produce or process?
d) What (intermediary) findings will you be able to discuss?
In answering these four questions in a succinct manner, the usual 200 to 300 words of an abstract are quickly used up.
And take your time! A good abstract is not written in just a few minutes. Even experienced researchers prefer to go over it several times.

Oral presentation (See Oral Presentation Guidelines (pdf) )

  • The presentation must adhere to the abstract that is accepted
    • Must remain a clinical practice focus or research focus
    • Must maintain the same teaching point, methods or results as summarized in the accepted abstract
  • SMRT Society for MR Radiographers & Technologists
    A Section of the ISMRM
    2300 Clayton Road, Suite 620 | Concord, CA, 94520 USA

    How to write abstract thesis

    how to write abstract thesis

    Oral presentation (See Oral Presentation Guidelines (pdf) )

  • The presentation must adhere to the abstract that is accepted
    • Must remain a clinical practice focus or research focus
    • Must maintain the same teaching point, methods or results as summarized in the accepted abstract
  • SMRT Society for MR Radiographers & Technologists
    A Section of the ISMRM
    2300 Clayton Road, Suite 620 | Concord, CA, 94520 USA

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