Luther's dissertation

Before the expression “follow the money” became an adage in politics and business and corruption and life, the Christian should have been taught to “follow the compassion.” For Jesus, it would seem, it all started with compassion. When such compassion leaves the church, we face much bigger crises than membership, attendance, and denominational futures. Today, now, there can’t be anything that is more important when bearing witness to the life, death, and resurrection of Jesus by communicating, living, breathing, and exhibiting compassion. God knows it is way too hard to find these days.

When King was assassinated in 1968, the nation shook with the impact. Riots broke out in over one hundred American cities. King was almost immediately sanctified by the white-controlled media, which, however, in its coverage of his accomplishments, also neglected the radicalism of his final three years. Instead his contemporaries focused (as we continue to focus today) on the spirit and the accomplishments of the middle of King's career. For many born after his death, he is known best for the "I Have a Dream" speech, which reflects this spirit, and which he delivered in 1963 at the height of his fame. The federal holiday commemorates this King, who articulated the progressive, human hope of the early 1960s.

There are those who are asking the devotees of civil rights, “When will you be satisfied?” We can never be satisfied as long as the Negro is the victim of the unspeakable horrors of police brutality. We can never be satisfied as long as our bodies, heavy with the fatigue of travel, cannot gain lodging in the motels of the highways and the hotels of the cities. We cannot be satisfied as long as the Negro’s basic mobility is from a smaller ghetto to a larger one. We can never be satisfied as long as our children are stripped of their self-hood and robbed of their dignity by signs stating: “For Whites Only.” We cannot be satisfied as long as a Negro in Mississippi cannot vote and a Negro in New York believes he has nothing for which to vote. No, no, we are not satisfied, and we will not be satisfied until “justice rolls down like waters, and righteousness like a mighty stream.”¹

article early 13c., "separate parts of anything written" (. the statements in the Apostles' Creed, the clauses of a statute or contract), from . article (13c.), from L. articulus, dim. of artus "a joint" (from PIE *ar-tu-, from *ar- "to fit together;" (see arm (1)). Meaning extended to "a small division," then generalized to "item, thing." Older sense preserved in Articles of War "military regulations" (1716) and Articles of Confederation (. history). Meaning "literary composition in a journal, etc." (independent, but part of a larger work) first recorded 1712. Meaning "piece of property" ... (clothing, etc.) first attested 1796, originally in rogue's cant.

Luther's dissertation

luther's dissertation

article early 13c., "separate parts of anything written" (. the statements in the Apostles' Creed, the clauses of a statute or contract), from . article (13c.), from L. articulus, dim. of artus "a joint" (from PIE *ar-tu-, from *ar- "to fit together;" (see arm (1)). Meaning extended to "a small division," then generalized to "item, thing." Older sense preserved in Articles of War "military regulations" (1716) and Articles of Confederation (. history). Meaning "literary composition in a journal, etc." (independent, but part of a larger work) first recorded 1712. Meaning "piece of property" ... (clothing, etc.) first attested 1796, originally in rogue's cant.

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